Do developers see WordPress as a threat to their jobs?

Although an intriguing question by itself, the reality is not at all.

When talking with passionate developers, the impression is that although they sometimes view it with one sort of prejudice or another, most of them consider WordPress as another in a myriad of convenient marketing tools that helps them do their job.

Someone who needs advanced custom features will still need to cooperate with a professional developer. As soon as you add that “1 plugin too many,” they will need some custom code to get everything to function the way they want it on a website. A lot of work from a development standpoint goes into a good WordPress site.

To sum it up, WordPress is great for many types of website, especially blogs of different kinds. There are lots of themes and plugins that make your life easier. But if you are looking to be a little more serious and need specific features that aren’t available in the free systems “out of the box” or via popular add-ons, you may want to consider a flexible, custom approach with:

  • Superior optimization
  • Tailor-made database, UI, and design
  • Superior UX (if done right)
  • More flexibility
  • Customization

The good side about it? It is a win-win situation. WordPress can serve all elements of the market. A beginner who needs a simple site (and can’t afford a professional developer) can make something usable in WordPress by using the right theme. A business that needs more than they can get from an “out-of-the-box” installation can hire a professional to create a custom site. Developers still get their share of coding, practical tools and piece of the pie, and rookies can create basic sites without spending a lot of money. WordPress theme markets simply enable people who would not otherwise be able to afford a website to have a reasonably nice one.

A real developer, who knows the eccentricities of WordPress, can actually make a good additional income.